Black And White Beijing

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Food Festival in 798

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Despite not taking any pictures of food, there really was a food festival. Everything outside just seemed better to take pictures of.

Taobao Find Of the Day

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Chinese Food

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Summer Almost Over

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Bei Bei Beijing

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Less than a month until my brother arrives, along with millions of Chinese people all coming to marvel at the capital and take part in the 70th anniversary of the founding of the CPC. Oh joy…

Back in Beijing

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It’s always a bittersweet feeling flying back into Beijing. Immediately, I’m confronted with swarms of Chinese people rushing through the airport trying to collect their five pieces of luggage from their four-day trip. Loud voices come creeping in through my headphones as people light cigarettes in the taxi line. “Welcome back!” my friends will tell me - to which I usually just say thanks instead of going on a rant of how much I loathe coming back here after a relaxing vacation. Regardless of my feelings, I’m back to work and back to my routine, which has its benefits. I like going to the gym at the same time every day, I enjoy riding my scooter instead of having to negotiate taxi prices, and it’s nice to use my computer again (which I typically don’t bring when I travel.)

On the other hand, ending a vacation sucks - a word my father deplores - but it pretty much sums up all my feelings about coming back home. I miss the weather, the new culture, the food, the ocean, the fact that when I wake up, I have no responsibilities. Traveling is great, but getting back to the ‘constants’ in my life is also nice. Perhaps one day I’ll figure out a way to combine them.

Cool Shirt

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Where do people even get shirts like this?

Broken Bikes

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Colorful Beijing Sunset

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Italian Chamber of Commerce Event

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This was an event held by the Italian Chamber of Commerce and it did not disappoint. Meats, cheeses, wine, bread - it was perfect.

Tsinghua iTalk Grad Speech

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Tsinghua University iTalk
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Had the opportunity to speak at Tsinghua’s 2019 graduation and farewell party. Lots of interesting speeches and congrats to all the grads!

Beijing Boredom

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I’m T-minus 370 days until I leave China. Just renewed my work visa and it will expire June 10, 2020, and I don’t intend on getting a new one - it’s time to start a new adventure elsewhere.

Hutong Sunday

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Xinhua Photos

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Photographer friend was doing an exhibition about foreigners in Beijing at their place of work, so here I am at Xinhua News Agency

Burger

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You probably wouldn’t expect it, but Beijing has some solid burger joints. This is Great Leap Brewery

May the Fourth Be With You

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Xi’an, China

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Xi'an is more than 3,000 years old and was known as Chang'an in ancient times. For 1,000 years, the city was the capital for 13 dynasties, and a total of 73 emperors ruled here. It is one of the oldest cities in China and the oldest of the Four Great Ancient Capitals. Xi'an is also the starting point of the Silk Road.

Xi'an means "Western Peace" and as of 2015, had a population of 8.7 million people.

Fun fact: Xi'an was the first city in China to be introduced to Islam. The Emperor of the Tang Dynasty officially allowed the practice of Islam in AD 651. Xi'an has a large Muslim community, the significant majority are from the Hui ethnic minority. 

Terracotta Army - Xi’an, China

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The Terracotta Armyis a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BCE with the purpose of protecting the emperor in his afterlife.

The figures, dating from approximately the late third century BCE, were discovered in 1974 by local farmers in Lintong County, outside Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.

The terracotta figures are life-sized and vary in height, uniform, and hairstyle in accordance with rank.

Also, I have no idea what that lady is doing squatting on the ledge.

Bird’s Nest - Beijing, China

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