Spring Festival 2019

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As interesting as “porn laundry” sounded, I didn’t check it out

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Koh Rong, Cambodia

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Koh Rong is the second largest island of Cambodia. The word Rong might refer to an old term for caveor tunnel although some islanders say Rong refers to a historical person's name.

Choeung Ek - Cambodia

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Choeung Ek is the site of a former orchard and mass grave of victims of the Khmer Rouge - killed between 1975 and 1979 - about 17 km south of Phnom Penh, Cambodia. It is the best-known of the sites known as The Killing Fields, where the Khmer Rouge regime executed over one million people between 1975 and 1979.

Royal Palace - Phnom Penh, Cambodia

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The Royal Palace is a complex of buildings which serves as the royal residence of the king of Cambodia.

Angkor Wat - 2

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The last picture is from a walking street in Saigon

Siem Reap - Angkor Wat, Cambodia

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Angkor Wat is a temple complex in Cambodia and one of the largest religious monuments in the world. Originally constructed as a Hindu temple dedicated to the god Vishnu for the Khmer Empire, it was gradually transformed into a Buddhist temple towards the end of the 12th century.

 

The movie Tomb Raider was shot in Ta Prohm (the pictures with the crazy trees). 

Hội An, Vietnam - Day 5

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 *Not me paragliding

Hội An has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1999. Other than that, it’s a nice place to enjoy the lanterns at night and drink some beer before taking a 20 hour sleeper train to Ho Chi Minh

Huế, Vietnam - Day 4

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Huế was the capital city of Vietnam for approximately 150 years during feudal times (1802–1945).

The building is a 19th-century citadel which encompasses the Imperial City, with palaces and shrines; the Forbidden Purple City, once the emperor's home. The city was also the battleground for the Battle of Huế, which was one of the longest and bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War.

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam - Day 2

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Ha Long Bay is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the name Ha Long means "descending dragon".

The bay consists of a dense cluster of some 1,600 limestone monolithic islands each topped with thick jungle vegetation. Hang Dau Go (Wooden stakes cave) is the largest grotto in the Ha Long area which was discovered by French tourists in the late 19th century. 

The movies “Pan”, “Kong: Skull Island”, and “James Bond - Tomorrow Never Dies” were all filmed here 

Degen Hill

This is my travel blog and writing portfolio covering my life in China and my trips around the world, including the food, experiences, people, culture, history, and architecture. Living in Beijing has been an adventure, so here's some insight into one of the world's biggest cities.

#beijing #china #asia #travel #adventure #expat #travelabroad #chinese

Hanoi, Vietnam - Day 1

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Hỏa Lò Prison was used by the French colonists in French Indochina for political prisoners, and later by North Vietnam for U.S. prisoners of war during the Vietnam war. During this later period it was known to American POWs as the Hanoi Hilton. The flight suit belongs to the late John McCain. The guillotine was one of two the French used to execute prisoners. 

 

My buddy Marc said he wanted to see more graffiti on here, so there you go buddy.  

Tokyo New Year

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Tokyo

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Hatsudai is the area where I stayed in Tokyo, right next to the major hub of Shinjuku

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Tokyo - Akasaka Palace + Tokyo Dome

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Palace was closed today, which was unexpected. The Tokyo Dome is also located in the middle of an urban intersection, so trying to get a complete shot of it was challenging. 

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Tokyo - Blue Skies

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Tokyo - Sunset

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These photos were taken from the 45th floor of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government building. Free entrance, and a gorgeous view of the city from the North Tower

Tokyo - Samurai Museum

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One thing I’ve noticed in Tokyo is the pride people take in their work. It started at the airport when a guy loaded all our bags onto the transit bus with a smiling face. People working at 7/11 are polite and very courteous, and construction workers on the street always smile as they let pedestrians pass by. Maybe it’s just noticeable here because people in Beijing don’t smile or show enthusiasm very often

Tokyo - Akihabara

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From what the tour guide stated as we drove through here, this is the sub-culture district of Tokyo. This includes video games, cosplay, and anime, and yes, anime porn as well. All the buildings have large anime posters on them and the first 3 floors of a building are devoted to video game characters, comics, and other fan-related merchandise. However, after that, the next floors are solely devoted to porn, sex toys, costumes, and every category of naughty anime erotica that one could imagine. Having browsed though here, I’m sure internet rule 34 applies; there was some weird stuff to say the least.

Tokyo - More

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One of the differences between China and Japan is the subway system. In China, the trains only travel along their designated line. In Japan, a subway car will transfer among multiple lines. In China, the train stops at designated points on the platform allowing the doors to line up with the corresponding markings on the ground. In Japan, it just stops at the station and people line up at the doors wherever they might be. In China, getting from the station to where you want to go usually requires some walking. In japan, probably because they have over 600+ stations, you can get exactly where you want to go. In China, subway lines are designated by numbers, which is simple. In Japan, every line has a different name, which is confusing if you aren’t accustomed to them. However, and this might be the deciding factor, Japan has public water fountains in the middle of the subway platform.

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Tokyo - Ferry + Fish Market

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The Statue of Liberty was a gift from France that was only gifted for 1 year to Japan and then taken back. The story goes that the Japanese people loved it so much they begged the French to give it back and so they did. It looks big, but it pales in comparison to the ‘real’ one in NY

Tokyo - Shrine + Temple

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